Venice sights on a clothesline

Venice sights on the clothesline

They are not normally included in guidebooks, but to me Venice sights on the clothesline count among the major attractions of the lagoon city.

Ask any Italian housewife and she will tell you that mechanical driers are a menace designed to ruin the fabric of your clothes. Even the spin in the washing machine should be avoided which explains why the RPM of my Danish washing machine is double as fast my Italian washer. From an Italian point of view laundry should be washed at high temperatures with lots of detergent and hung outside to air and dry. The laundry is not a statement against global warming but a sign of good housekeeping, which is all very well when you don’t need to worry about a cold, rainy climate.

venice sights on a clothesline

To me the outdoor clothes lines have become a symbol of Italy. Especially old cities like Napoli and Venice where colourful garlands of socks and shirt sleeves crisscross the narrow alleys or ‘calle’ that mark the paved back entrance of the houses, while the front door face the canals. Along house fronts strands of laundry connect the windows belonging to one apartment allowing a glimpse of the tenants’ private life to be visible in public. It is not hard to deduct age, family size and social status from the items on a clothesline.

That makes clothesline studies so highly entertaining and recommendable as one of the free characteristic Venice sights.

More than Venice sights on the clothesline

10 interesting gondola facts

Venice islands you don’t want to miss

Districts of Venice: The charming backwaters


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21 replies
  1. Leigh
    Leigh says:

    I can never get enough clothesline shots. I love them and personally I much prefer how the clothes smell if they’ve been dried outdoors.

    Reply
  2. Sophie
    Sophie says:

    Quintessentially Italian, aren’t they…

    Though I’m old enough to remember clothes lines here in Scandinavia, too (or clothes carousels). Still see them occasionally in summer.

    Reply
  3. Mary {The World Is A Book}
    Mary {The World Is A Book} says:

    I have fond memories of clothes hanging out to dry in the Philippines growing up. I don’t remember having any clothesline shots in Venice but have quite a few in Burano. I may have been too busy admiring Venice’s doors and windows. Fun post, Mette!

    Reply
  4. Laurel
    Laurel says:

    What a fun post! I think you can tell a lot by a person’s laundry which is why I hang mine hidden on my balcony. My washing machine in Germany is also much slower than mine was in Canada.

    Reply
  5. Dana Carmel @ Time Travel Plans
    Dana Carmel @ Time Travel Plans says:

    Clothesline sightseeing – that’s such a unique angle! Although I use a dryer, I love the feel and smell of clothes dried on the line better than those dried in a dryer. I’d like to invite you to link up every Wednesday on my blog for Wanderlust Wednesdays. You can submit at the link below.

    Reply

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. […] […] To me the outdoor clothes lines have become a symbol of Italy. Especially old cities like Napoli and Venice where colourful garlands of socks and shirt sleeves crisscross the narrow alleys or ‘calle’ that mark the paved back entrance of the houses, while the front door face the canals. Along house fronts strands of laundry connect the windows belonging to one apartment allowing a glimpse of the tenants’ private life to be visible in public. It is not hard to deduct age, family size and social status from the items on a clothesline. […]  […]

  2. […] […] To me the outdoor clothes lines have become a symbol of Italy. Especially old cities like Napoli and Venice where colourful garlands of socks and shirt sleeves crisscross the narrow alleys or ‘calle’ that mark the paved back entrance of the houses, while the front door face the canals. Along house fronts strands of laundry connect the windows belonging to one apartment allowing a glimpse of the tenants’ private life to be visible in public. It is not hard to deduct age, family size and social status from the items on a clothesline. […]  […]

  3. […] […] To me the outdoor clothes lines have become a symbol of Italy. Especially old cities like Napoli and Venice where colourful garlands of socks and shirt sleeves crisscross the narrow alleys or ‘calle’ that mark the paved back entrance of the houses, while the front door face the canals. Along house fronts strands of laundry connect the windows belonging to one apartment allowing a glimpse of the tenants’ private life to be visible in public. It is not hard to deduct age, family size and social status from the items on a clothesline. […]  […]

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